+
"Please, Lord, don’t make me have to be interesting today."
+
jordanvkifer:

mymodernmet:

Ten years ago, photographers James and Karla Murray began documenting the unique storefronts that define New York as a wonderfully diverse place to live. After a decade had passed, the pair went back to the same locations, only to sadly discover that many of the charming family-owned stores had been pushed out and replaced by large chains, banks, and generic businesses. The Murrays documented these rapid changes with side-by-side photographs compiled in a book entitled Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York.
jordanvkifer:

mymodernmet:

Ten years ago, photographers James and Karla Murray began documenting the unique storefronts that define New York as a wonderfully diverse place to live. After a decade had passed, the pair went back to the same locations, only to sadly discover that many of the charming family-owned stores had been pushed out and replaced by large chains, banks, and generic businesses. The Murrays documented these rapid changes with side-by-side photographs compiled in a book entitled Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York.
jordanvkifer:

mymodernmet:

Ten years ago, photographers James and Karla Murray began documenting the unique storefronts that define New York as a wonderfully diverse place to live. After a decade had passed, the pair went back to the same locations, only to sadly discover that many of the charming family-owned stores had been pushed out and replaced by large chains, banks, and generic businesses. The Murrays documented these rapid changes with side-by-side photographs compiled in a book entitled Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York.
jordanvkifer:

mymodernmet:

Ten years ago, photographers James and Karla Murray began documenting the unique storefronts that define New York as a wonderfully diverse place to live. After a decade had passed, the pair went back to the same locations, only to sadly discover that many of the charming family-owned stores had been pushed out and replaced by large chains, banks, and generic businesses. The Murrays documented these rapid changes with side-by-side photographs compiled in a book entitled Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York.
jordanvkifer:

mymodernmet:

Ten years ago, photographers James and Karla Murray began documenting the unique storefronts that define New York as a wonderfully diverse place to live. After a decade had passed, the pair went back to the same locations, only to sadly discover that many of the charming family-owned stores had been pushed out and replaced by large chains, banks, and generic businesses. The Murrays documented these rapid changes with side-by-side photographs compiled in a book entitled Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York.
+
nevver:

Stay cool
+

Jose Duran #TBT with Omahyra and Patricia Mota

Jose Duran #TBT with Omahyra and Patricia Mota

Jose Duran #TBT with Omahyra and Patricia Mota

Jose Duran #TBT with Omahyra and Patricia Mota

Jose Duran #TBT with Omahyra and Patricia Mota
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nevver:

I can tell
+
badgirlswearchanel:

Pretty women wonder where my secret lies.
I’m not cute or built to suit a fashion model’s size   
But when I start to tell them,
They think I’m telling lies.
I say,
It’s in the reach of my arms,
The span of my hips,   
The stride of my step,   
The curl of my lips.   
I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,   
That’s me.

I walk into a room
Just as cool as you please,   
And to a man,
The fellows stand or
Fall down on their knees.   
Then they swarm around me,
A hive of honey bees.   
I say,
It’s the fire in my eyes,   
And the flash of my teeth,   
The swing in my waist,   
And the joy in my feet.   
I’m a woman
Phenomenally.

Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.

Men themselves have wondered   
What they see in me.
They try so much
But they can’t touch
My inner mystery.
When I try to show them,   
They say they still can’t see.   
I say,
It’s in the arch of my back,   
The sun of my smile,
The ride of my breasts,
The grace of my style.
I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.

Now you understand
Just why my head’s not bowed.   
I don’t shout or jump about
Or have to talk real loud.   
When you see me passing,
It ought to make you proud.
I say,
It’s in the click of my heels,   
The bend of my hair,   
the palm of my hand,   
The need for my care.   
’Cause I’m a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal woman,
That’s me.
+
akromme:

unflavoredwaxedfloss20:

by kylewyss http://ift.tt/1iL2v3P

 youre just gonna put the bottom of your foot on your girl? ur nasty doo doo foot bottom? on ur girl? these hypbeasts got 0 respect
+
nevver:

Someone like me
+
skelethoughts:

Lily Rose Thomas
'Beneath The Street Light', 2013.
skelethoughts:

Lily Rose Thomas
'Beneath The Street Light', 2013.
skelethoughts:

Lily Rose Thomas
'Beneath The Street Light', 2013.
skelethoughts:

Lily Rose Thomas
'Beneath The Street Light', 2013.
skelethoughts:

Lily Rose Thomas
'Beneath The Street Light', 2013.
skelethoughts:

Lily Rose Thomas
'Beneath The Street Light', 2013.
skelethoughts:

Lily Rose Thomas
'Beneath The Street Light', 2013.
+
likeafieldmouse:

John Knuth - Master Plan (2014) - Watercolor, gouache, flyspeck and acrylic on canvas
For anyone who doesn’t know (because I didn’t & had to look it up), flyspeck is the stain left by the excrement of a fly. 
…
"The artist feeds watercolor paint to hundreds of thousands of common houseflies. The flies regurgitate the paint on the canvas. As they eat, they digest externally. Every time they land on a surface of something there is a chance they will deposit what they just ate on that surface. That mark is called a flyspeck. 
To control this process, the artist builds boxes that limit the flies’ movements to the surface area of the canvas. The final paintings are comprised of millions of small dots of paint, determined by inevitable deposits of these flies. While created with a degree of chance, the artist, through research and continued refinement of his process, is largely in control of where and to what amount the paint is applied. 
The colorful paintings reside in a space between landscape and abstraction. For Knuth, they are analogous to the man-made infrastructure of Los Angeles, with denser areas next to marks that are sparser and sprawl about the canvas.”
likeafieldmouse:

John Knuth - Master Plan (2014) - Watercolor, gouache, flyspeck and acrylic on canvas
For anyone who doesn’t know (because I didn’t & had to look it up), flyspeck is the stain left by the excrement of a fly. 
…
"The artist feeds watercolor paint to hundreds of thousands of common houseflies. The flies regurgitate the paint on the canvas. As they eat, they digest externally. Every time they land on a surface of something there is a chance they will deposit what they just ate on that surface. That mark is called a flyspeck. 
To control this process, the artist builds boxes that limit the flies’ movements to the surface area of the canvas. The final paintings are comprised of millions of small dots of paint, determined by inevitable deposits of these flies. While created with a degree of chance, the artist, through research and continued refinement of his process, is largely in control of where and to what amount the paint is applied. 
The colorful paintings reside in a space between landscape and abstraction. For Knuth, they are analogous to the man-made infrastructure of Los Angeles, with denser areas next to marks that are sparser and sprawl about the canvas.”
likeafieldmouse:

John Knuth - Master Plan (2014) - Watercolor, gouache, flyspeck and acrylic on canvas
For anyone who doesn’t know (because I didn’t & had to look it up), flyspeck is the stain left by the excrement of a fly. 
…
"The artist feeds watercolor paint to hundreds of thousands of common houseflies. The flies regurgitate the paint on the canvas. As they eat, they digest externally. Every time they land on a surface of something there is a chance they will deposit what they just ate on that surface. That mark is called a flyspeck. 
To control this process, the artist builds boxes that limit the flies’ movements to the surface area of the canvas. The final paintings are comprised of millions of small dots of paint, determined by inevitable deposits of these flies. While created with a degree of chance, the artist, through research and continued refinement of his process, is largely in control of where and to what amount the paint is applied. 
The colorful paintings reside in a space between landscape and abstraction. For Knuth, they are analogous to the man-made infrastructure of Los Angeles, with denser areas next to marks that are sparser and sprawl about the canvas.”
likeafieldmouse:

John Knuth - Master Plan (2014) - Watercolor, gouache, flyspeck and acrylic on canvas
For anyone who doesn’t know (because I didn’t & had to look it up), flyspeck is the stain left by the excrement of a fly. 
…
"The artist feeds watercolor paint to hundreds of thousands of common houseflies. The flies regurgitate the paint on the canvas. As they eat, they digest externally. Every time they land on a surface of something there is a chance they will deposit what they just ate on that surface. That mark is called a flyspeck. 
To control this process, the artist builds boxes that limit the flies’ movements to the surface area of the canvas. The final paintings are comprised of millions of small dots of paint, determined by inevitable deposits of these flies. While created with a degree of chance, the artist, through research and continued refinement of his process, is largely in control of where and to what amount the paint is applied. 
The colorful paintings reside in a space between landscape and abstraction. For Knuth, they are analogous to the man-made infrastructure of Los Angeles, with denser areas next to marks that are sparser and sprawl about the canvas.”
likeafieldmouse:

John Knuth - Master Plan (2014) - Watercolor, gouache, flyspeck and acrylic on canvas
For anyone who doesn’t know (because I didn’t & had to look it up), flyspeck is the stain left by the excrement of a fly. 
…
"The artist feeds watercolor paint to hundreds of thousands of common houseflies. The flies regurgitate the paint on the canvas. As they eat, they digest externally. Every time they land on a surface of something there is a chance they will deposit what they just ate on that surface. That mark is called a flyspeck. 
To control this process, the artist builds boxes that limit the flies’ movements to the surface area of the canvas. The final paintings are comprised of millions of small dots of paint, determined by inevitable deposits of these flies. While created with a degree of chance, the artist, through research and continued refinement of his process, is largely in control of where and to what amount the paint is applied. 
The colorful paintings reside in a space between landscape and abstraction. For Knuth, they are analogous to the man-made infrastructure of Los Angeles, with denser areas next to marks that are sparser and sprawl about the canvas.”
likeafieldmouse:

John Knuth - Master Plan (2014) - Watercolor, gouache, flyspeck and acrylic on canvas
For anyone who doesn’t know (because I didn’t & had to look it up), flyspeck is the stain left by the excrement of a fly. 
…
"The artist feeds watercolor paint to hundreds of thousands of common houseflies. The flies regurgitate the paint on the canvas. As they eat, they digest externally. Every time they land on a surface of something there is a chance they will deposit what they just ate on that surface. That mark is called a flyspeck. 
To control this process, the artist builds boxes that limit the flies’ movements to the surface area of the canvas. The final paintings are comprised of millions of small dots of paint, determined by inevitable deposits of these flies. While created with a degree of chance, the artist, through research and continued refinement of his process, is largely in control of where and to what amount the paint is applied. 
The colorful paintings reside in a space between landscape and abstraction. For Knuth, they are analogous to the man-made infrastructure of Los Angeles, with denser areas next to marks that are sparser and sprawl about the canvas.”
likeafieldmouse:

John Knuth - Master Plan (2014) - Watercolor, gouache, flyspeck and acrylic on canvas
For anyone who doesn’t know (because I didn’t & had to look it up), flyspeck is the stain left by the excrement of a fly. 
…
"The artist feeds watercolor paint to hundreds of thousands of common houseflies. The flies regurgitate the paint on the canvas. As they eat, they digest externally. Every time they land on a surface of something there is a chance they will deposit what they just ate on that surface. That mark is called a flyspeck. 
To control this process, the artist builds boxes that limit the flies’ movements to the surface area of the canvas. The final paintings are comprised of millions of small dots of paint, determined by inevitable deposits of these flies. While created with a degree of chance, the artist, through research and continued refinement of his process, is largely in control of where and to what amount the paint is applied. 
The colorful paintings reside in a space between landscape and abstraction. For Knuth, they are analogous to the man-made infrastructure of Los Angeles, with denser areas next to marks that are sparser and sprawl about the canvas.”
likeafieldmouse:

John Knuth - Master Plan (2014) - Watercolor, gouache, flyspeck and acrylic on canvas
For anyone who doesn’t know (because I didn’t & had to look it up), flyspeck is the stain left by the excrement of a fly. 
…
"The artist feeds watercolor paint to hundreds of thousands of common houseflies. The flies regurgitate the paint on the canvas. As they eat, they digest externally. Every time they land on a surface of something there is a chance they will deposit what they just ate on that surface. That mark is called a flyspeck. 
To control this process, the artist builds boxes that limit the flies’ movements to the surface area of the canvas. The final paintings are comprised of millions of small dots of paint, determined by inevitable deposits of these flies. While created with a degree of chance, the artist, through research and continued refinement of his process, is largely in control of where and to what amount the paint is applied. 
The colorful paintings reside in a space between landscape and abstraction. For Knuth, they are analogous to the man-made infrastructure of Los Angeles, with denser areas next to marks that are sparser and sprawl about the canvas.”
likeafieldmouse:

John Knuth - Master Plan (2014) - Watercolor, gouache, flyspeck and acrylic on canvas
For anyone who doesn’t know (because I didn’t & had to look it up), flyspeck is the stain left by the excrement of a fly. 
…
"The artist feeds watercolor paint to hundreds of thousands of common houseflies. The flies regurgitate the paint on the canvas. As they eat, they digest externally. Every time they land on a surface of something there is a chance they will deposit what they just ate on that surface. That mark is called a flyspeck. 
To control this process, the artist builds boxes that limit the flies’ movements to the surface area of the canvas. The final paintings are comprised of millions of small dots of paint, determined by inevitable deposits of these flies. While created with a degree of chance, the artist, through research and continued refinement of his process, is largely in control of where and to what amount the paint is applied. 
The colorful paintings reside in a space between landscape and abstraction. For Knuth, they are analogous to the man-made infrastructure of Los Angeles, with denser areas next to marks that are sparser and sprawl about the canvas.”
likeafieldmouse:

John Knuth - Master Plan (2014) - Watercolor, gouache, flyspeck and acrylic on canvas
For anyone who doesn’t know (because I didn’t & had to look it up), flyspeck is the stain left by the excrement of a fly. 
…
"The artist feeds watercolor paint to hundreds of thousands of common houseflies. The flies regurgitate the paint on the canvas. As they eat, they digest externally. Every time they land on a surface of something there is a chance they will deposit what they just ate on that surface. That mark is called a flyspeck. 
To control this process, the artist builds boxes that limit the flies’ movements to the surface area of the canvas. The final paintings are comprised of millions of small dots of paint, determined by inevitable deposits of these flies. While created with a degree of chance, the artist, through research and continued refinement of his process, is largely in control of where and to what amount the paint is applied. 
The colorful paintings reside in a space between landscape and abstraction. For Knuth, they are analogous to the man-made infrastructure of Los Angeles, with denser areas next to marks that are sparser and sprawl about the canvas.”
+
nevver:

Hitchcock’s “The Peeps”
+
ratherfuck:

Totes les paraules del món by Sergi Serra Mir on Flickr.
+
wetheurban:


PHOTOGRAPHY: Yearbook by Ryan McGinley
Master nudist photography, Ryan McGinley, shoots a vast array of young male models, documenting youth culture and boys being young, wild, and free. (NSFW)
Read More
wetheurban:


PHOTOGRAPHY: Yearbook by Ryan McGinley
Master nudist photography, Ryan McGinley, shoots a vast array of young male models, documenting youth culture and boys being young, wild, and free. (NSFW)
Read More
wetheurban:


PHOTOGRAPHY: Yearbook by Ryan McGinley
Master nudist photography, Ryan McGinley, shoots a vast array of young male models, documenting youth culture and boys being young, wild, and free. (NSFW)
Read More
+
nevver:

Born on this day, Vincent van Gogh
nevver:

Born on this day, Vincent van Gogh
nevver:

Born on this day, Vincent van Gogh
nevver:

Born on this day, Vincent van Gogh
nevver:

Born on this day, Vincent van Gogh
nevver:

Born on this day, Vincent van Gogh
nevver:

Born on this day, Vincent van Gogh
nevver:

Born on this day, Vincent van Gogh
Album Art
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